Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial Fibrillation

Also known as AFib or AF and it is basically an irregular heartbeat or arrhythmia.

It can lead to heart failure, strokes, blood clots and other heart-related syndromes. Atrial Fibrillation is also sometimes referred to as a quivering heart.

Those who are obese or overweight carry an increased risk of AF symptoms. The risk factors associated with AF are high cholesterol, diabetes, high blood pressure, sleep apnoea, smoking and too much alcohol,

AFib can be diagnosed by a physical examination using an ECG (electrocardiogram). Additionally, a patient activated event recorder or Holter monitor can be used.

Some of the symptoms are:

  • Dizziness
  • General Fatigue
  • Chest Pain
  • Rapid and Irregular Heartbeat (Heart Palpitations)
  • Weakness
  • Fainting and Confusion/Lightheaded
  • Breathlessness

(But some people with AFib have no symptoms at all)

We have included a really good video from the USA, which explains the subject in a clear and concise manner:

If you suspect that yourself, or someone you know has atrial fibrillation, this will help educate you on the subject, but in learning more about AF, you will understand that you should immediately seek professional advice, and that treatment can save lives.

You should initially know the symptoms, you should learn more about AFib and your heart.  For example, what symptoms might you experience. You should look to understand the risk factors and how you can reduce them.

Then you should understand your treatment options, with the right treatment, many of the outcomes listed above can be prevented.

Seeking professional help can teach you more about

  • Medication options
  • Treatment Goals
  • Other procedures that may help

Contact Us Here 

TAVI Round Table Discussion

Dr Jonathan Byrne took part in a TAVI Round Table Discussion.

The assembled panel of internationally-recognised opinion leaders provide expert opinion and insight on the considerations when undertaking a TAVI procedure.

The other members of the panel were:
Simon Kennon (Chair), London Chest Hospital, UK
Enrico Ferrari, Cardiovascular Surgery Department, University Hospital of Lausanne, Switzerland
Carlos Ruiz, Lenox Hill Heart and Vascular Institute of New York, US
Lars Søndergaard,Rigshospitalet Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark
Corrado Tamburino, University of Catania, Catania, Italy

Session 1: Interpreting TAVI Research Data
In the first session from the TAVI Round Table Discussion, the assembled panel of internationally-recognised opinion leaders discuss interpreting TAVI research data. Designed to support the continuous education of practicing physicians, this first session shares leading opinion and addresses the following questions and key educational objectives:
• Is TAVI effective?
• Is TAVI cost-effective?
• How useful are risk scoring and frailty assessment?
• How to manage asymptomatic high risk patients.
• Is it appropriate to treat intermediate risk patients with currently available technology?

Session 2: TAVI – Planning the Procedure
This second session shares leading opinion and addresses the following questions and key educational objectives:
Assessment: Imaging and investigations
Should trans-femoral be the default access route?
General anaesthetic or sedation; TOE or ICE?
Closure device or surgical cut down?

Session 3: Aortic Regurgitation After TAVI
This session shares leading opinion and addresses the following questions and key educational objectives:
Assessing the aortic valve
Choosing prosthesis and size
Different mechanisms of paravalvular leaks; how to prevent and treat them

Session 4: TAVI and Coronary Artery Disease
This session shares leading opinion and addresses the following questions and key educational objectives:
Approaches to patients with severe aortic stenosis and CAD undergoing TAVI
Treating coronary artery obstruction after TAVI
Concluding remarks and takeaway messages

Session 5: TAVI Complications
his session shares leading opinion and addresses the following questions and key educational objectives:
What is the risk of stroke, and how can it be prevented?
Predictors of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing TAVI
Prevention and treatment of acute kidney injury during and after TAVI

Session 6: TAVI – What’s in the Pipeline?
This session shares leading opinion and addresses the following questions and key educational objectives:
Forthcoming research
Forthcoming technologies
Concluding remarks and key takeaway messages

Mumbai-born doc set to revolutionise bypass surgery

As reported in the Times of India…

When Dr Ranjit Deshpande gets ready to perform a cardiac bypass surgery in London’s King’s College, there is no role for the saw that has traditionally been used to cut open the breast bone in order to expose the heart. The Bandra boy instead uses an endoscopic camera and a huge LCD TV to get a ‘close’ look at the beating heart.

His patients go home within 48 hours without the tell-tale eight-inch scar on their chest.

New heart bypass surgery at King’s reduces scarring and helps patients recover faster

As posted on King’s College Hospital Website..

A new approach to heart bypass surgery at King’s College Hospital is helping to speed up patients’ recovery, cut infection rates and minimise scarring from surgery.

Cardiac surgeons at King’s are confident the procedure – called endoscopy assisted minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass surgery (ENDO-MIDCAB) – will radically change the treatment of selected patients at King’s with chest pain caused by narrowing of blood vessels associated with coronary artery disease.

At last, a heart bypass where they DON’T have to saw your chest open..

An Article first published by Carol Davis in The Daily Mail….

Every year 20,000 people have a heart bypass because they have blocked arteries. Traditionally, the surgery involves sawing through the breastbone. FARAMARZ ZARE, 45, a computer engineer from Welling, Kent, was one of the first to undergo a new, much less invasive procedure.

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